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Saalfeld: Prelude to Jena
Saalfeld: Prelude to Jena
Price: $11.95

In October 1806, Napoleon’s Grande Armee is descending on western Saxony in multiple columns. The Saxons and their more powerful Prussian cousins are gathering to give battle. On 10 October, the advance guard of one French column crashes into the advance guard for one wing of the allied armies. A French victory will open the possibility of splitting the allies; an allied victory will threaten the flank of the other French columns. Time presses both. The forces are equal in strength; victory goes to the player who best understands the strengths and weaknesses of each side.

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Molino Del Rey: Gateway to Mexico City
Molino Del Rey: Gateway to Mexico City
Price: $11.95

In August 1847, Winfield Scott’s US Army was at the gates of Mexico City after a string of victories over Santa Anna. However, Scott paused to negotiate. Both sides used the delay to regroup, but when Scott heard a rumor that the Mexicans were casting cannon (true) at Molino del Rey (false), he resolved to take the place. The Mexicans saw it coming and prepared their defenses. The result was a narrow but costly American win that left the city's defenses intact. A quicker victory might have pushed into the city and ended the war.

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Chantilly: Jackson's Missed Opportunity
Chantilly: Jackson's Missed Opportunity
Price: $11.95

After the Confederate victory at Second Bull Run in August 1862, Stonewall Jackson led his wing of the Confederate army to get behind the retreating Federals and finish the job. Mud and fatigue slowed him just enough to allow some hastily-collected Federal units to get in position to stop him. The result was a confused battle near Chantilly. At stake was the survival of an entire Union army, or of Jackson's isolated Confederates.


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Salem Church: East of Chancellorsville
Salem Church: East of Chancellorsville
Price: $11.95

As the battle of Chancellorsville raged, a Union corps was dispatched to hit the vulnerable Confederate army from behind. The flanking column was delayed by a single Confederate brigade at Salem Church. The battle grew as Confederate arrived first to firm up the front, then to turn the tables on the Federals. The flankers became flanked, then had to fight for their lives.

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Marengo: Morning Defeat, Afternoon Victory
Marengo: Morning Defeat, Afternoon Victory
Price: $24.95

After crossing the Alps in 1800 and advancing into northern Italy, Napoleon overextended his army in an attempt to ambush a portion of the Austrian army. Misreading the situation, the hunter became the hunted when the main Austrian army in Italy, over 30,000 soldiers with 100 cannon, advanced against Napoleon's 18,000 troops and dozen cannon on the Marengo plain more info
Chickamauga: River of Death
Chickamauga: River of Death
Price: $24.95

Once again the Union Army of the Cumberland was in pursuit of Gen. Bragg's Army of the Tennessee, after the Confederate withdrawal from Chattanooga. Bragg's actual intention was to stand and fight. In fact, this time — indeed, for the first time — his army, heavily reinforced, actually outnumbered his pursuers. As the dispersed Federals deployed along the Chickamauga River, large numbers of Confederates assembled to strike the counter-blow. The Battle of Chickamauga would be the Confederates' last opportunity to annihilate an entire Union Army. more info
Stones River: Turning Point in Tennessee
Stones River: Turning Point in Tennessee
Price: $24.95

The Union Army of the Cumberland had been pursing the Confederate Army of the Tennessee after the Battle of Perryville, in October 1862. Throughout November the Confederate commander, Braxton Bragg, had misinterpreted that pursuit as an effort to capture Chattanooga; so now he halted and deployed his troops northwest of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, so as to safeguard the road junction there. Thus the Confederates sat and awaited their pursuers for a month. When the Federal army arrived in late December 1862, the Confederates launched a surprise attack near Stones River. more info
Frayser's Farm: Wasted Opportunity
Frayser's Farm: Wasted Opportunity
Price: $24.95

In June 1862, as Federal troops attempted to retreat after withdrawing from Gaine's Mill, Virginia, Gen. Robert E. Lee saw an opportunity to annihilate them on the congested roads between White Oak Swamp and the small community of Glendale. Lee's army included most of the notable Confederate luminaries, such as "Stonewall" Jackson, "Old Pete" Longstreet, A. P. Hill and others, collectively fielding 45,000 men. The Federals, numbering about 40,000, had become disjointed as they attempted to reach and cross the James River. At the same time, though, the Confederate approach became uncoordinated and irregular. The mass of the battle eventually pivoted north of Nelson's Farm, known to the locals by its former owner's name, Frayser. more info
Shiloh: Grant Surprised
Shiloh: Grant Surprised
Price: $24.95

There would never be a better chance to hit the Federals and inflict a decisive defeat on them than in April 1862. Two of the advancing Union armies in the Western Theater hadn't yet converged. The Confederates thus perceived a rare opportunity to concentrate against Grant's six divisions at Pittsburg Landing on the west bank of the Tennessee River. Organized into four corps, Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston marched his men 20 miles from Corinth, Mississippi, toward the Federal troops bivouacked along a skirmish line extending from the bank of the Tennessee River to the small "Shiloh" church inland. more info
Mansfield: Crisis in the Pine Barrens (QP)
Mansfield: Crisis in the Pine Barrens (QP)
Price: $11.95

In early 1864, Union Gen. Nathaniel Banks led a small army up Louisiana's Red River. His objective, in conjunction with an overland campaign through Arkansas, was the Confederate Trans-Mississippi capital at Shreveport. Poor coordination of the two columns enabled the Confederates to concentrate their slender resources against each in turn. Banks was first, and in early April his spearhead was hit near the crossroads of Mansfield. Historically, the Union forces, strung out on the march, were routed piecemeal, but the battle could have gone the other way.

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